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The Society for Insect Studies Inc. is a non-profit organisation which meets at the Australian Museum, Sydney Australia, and consists of members dedicated to the promotion of the study of insects and related forms.

The Society achieves this by means of meetings, lectures, exhibits, excursions, publications and a general involvement with related organisations. The Society's motto Preserve the Habitat, reflects a major objective - the conservation of insects by habitat preservation. An annually elected council oversees the society's activities.

Upcoming Events

General Meeting 12 June 2018

Tuesday, 12 June 2018 at 7.30 pm
Culture Space Level 2, Australian Museum

 

Ian Burnet: Where Australia Collides with Asia


Where Australia Collides with Asia - The Epic Voyages of Joseph Banks, Charles Darwin, Alfred Russel Wallace and the origin of On The Origin of Species

Alfred Russel Wallace recognised the boundary between the fauna of Asia and Australasia when he crossed the narrow strait between Bali and Lombok in 1856. This boundary was subsequently named the Wallace Line and the biogeographic region of Eastern Indonesia is known as Wallacea in his honour.

It was tectonic plate movement which brought these disparate worlds together and it was Alfred Russel Wallace’s ‘Letter from Ternate’ that forced Charles Darwin to finally publish his landmark work ‘On the Origin of Species’.

Ian Burnet uses their books, diaries and letters to tell the remarkable story of ‘Where Australia Collides with Asia’.

*** Also Show and Tell, and refreshments after the talk ***

PLEASE NOTE: Access to the building for the meeting is via the steps from William Street. If you require step-free access please phone Helen Smith on 0448 560 255 or Graham Owen on 0418 971 458, preferably PRIOR to the night.

Regulars please confirm by Monday midday (email/text to Helen) to go on the advance sign-in list.

General Meeting April 2018

Tuesday, 10 April 2018 at 7.30 pm
Australian Museum

 

Speaker: Chris Reid   Social structures; new insights into the self-assembled architectures built by (and of) ants


Army ants in the New World and tropical Australian weaver ants both build complex, dynamic structures that perform a variety of functions for the colony. Such structures include bridges, ramps, chains and accommodation for the colony. I will talk about my recent work conducted on army ants in Panama and weaver ants in Townsville, to understand more about how living structures are built by these small animals, using local information and self-organised processes alone. These empirical investigations could provide rules for collective function that can generalise to other systems, such as swarm robotics, developmental processes and nano-assembly.

Chris Reid is a Research Fellow at Macquarie University. He studies the behaviour of natural distributed systems, which are systems consisting of many individual units, each acting on its own with no centralised control of the collective. The thousands of tiny interactions between the individuals leads to sophisticated ‘emergent’ behaviour at the group level, such as solving mazes and making complicated trade-off decisions.

*** Also Show and Tell, and refreshments after the talk ***

PLEASE NOTE: Access to the building for the meeting is via the steps from William Street. If you require step-free access please phone Helen Smith on 0448 560 255 or Graham Owen on 0418 971 458, preferably PRIOR to the night.